Can you think of any other examples of this phenomenon in the English language?

Question by Jon: Can you think of any other examples of this phenomenon in the English language?
Words like “coup” and phrases like “a la carte” that have been adopted into English, but are commonly misused or used in manners differing from the original definition. Both of these are from French, but I was curious if anybody could list some more, from any language.

Best answer:

Answer by Mark
“Double entendre” (never ever used in French)

“pajamas” (in Hindi, it’s something you might wear out and about, not in bed)

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One thought on “Can you think of any other examples of this phenomenon in the English language?”

  1. “alcohol”
    – originally Arabic “al kohl” (black eye-paint made from the mineral stibnite), but the meaning drifted from generalised “fine powder” to any substance obtained by distilation, to any liquid obtained by distillation, to the liquids now classed as alcohols.

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