What is my heritage? My last names Proctor. What is that?

Question by Logan: What is my heritage? My last names Proctor. What is that?
Irish,German, Etc. IDUNNO! and are there any sites i can find my family tree?

Best answer:

Answer by Joyce B
Your heritage is much more than one name. What about your mother’s side? Grandparents? If you want to know where all of your ancestors came from you will have to do the research. It is highly unlikely that the family tree fairy has made a tree just for you and posted it on ancestry.com.

Proctor Name Meaning and History
English (northern): occupational name from Middle English prok(e)tour ‘steward’ (reduced from Old French procurateour, Latin procurator ‘agent’, from procurare ‘to manage’). The term was used most commonly of an attorney in a spiritual court, but also of other officials such as collectors of taxes and agents licensed to collect alms on behalf of lepers and enclosed orders of monks.

Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

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2 thoughts on “What is my heritage? My last names Proctor. What is that?”

  1. Proctor Name Meaning and History
    English (northern): occupational name from Middle English prok(e)tour ‘steward’ (reduced from Old French procurateour, Latin procurator ‘agent’, from procurare ‘to manage’). The term was used most commonly of an attorney in a spiritual court, but also of other officials such as collectors of taxes and agents licensed to collect alms on behalf of lepers and enclosed orders of monks.
    Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4
    http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Proctor-family-history.ashx

    Proctor Surname
    This interesting surname is of early medieval English origin, and is an occupational name for a steward, deriving from the Middle English “prok(e)tour”, a contracted form of the Old French “procurateor”, from the Latin “procurare”, to manage. The term was used most commonly for an attorney in a spiritual court, but also of other officials such as collectors of taxes and agents licensed to collect alms on behalf of lepers and enclosed orders of monks. Variant forms of the surname, in the modern idiom, include Prockter and Procter. The surname first appears in records in the late 13th Century (see below), while other early examples include: William le Procuratur, recorded in Lincolnshire in 1292; Johanna la Proketour, noted in the Subsidy Rolls of Yorkshire in 1301; and John Proketour, listed in the 1356 Book of Fees of Durham Priory. An interesting namebearer was Richard Anthony Proctor (1837 – 1888), who according to the “Dictionary of National Biography” was an imminent astronomer, who successfully lectured in America in 1873, and founded “Knowledge”, a weekly scientific periodical in 1881. The family Coat of Arms depicts on a silver shield, a black chevron between three red martlets. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thomas le Procurator, which was dated 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of Lincolnshire”, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as “The Hammer of the Scots”, 1272 – 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. © Copyright: Name Origin Research http://www.surnamedb.com 1980 – 2010 Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?name=Proctor#ixzz0ohvT284n

    Proctor Surname
    SURNAMES as we know them today were first assumed in Europe from the 11th to the 15th century. They were not in used in England or in Scotland, before the Norman Conquest, and were first found in Europe in the Domesday Book of 1086. The employment in the use of a second name was a custom that was first introduced from the Normans. They themselves had not long before adopted them. It became, in course of time, a mark of gentler blood, and was deemed a disgrace for a gentleman to have but one single name, as the meaner sort had. It was not until the reign of Edward II (1307-1327) it became general practice amongst all people. PROCTER was derived from the latin word ‘Procurator’ a name used of an attorney in a spiritual court. The name was taken to Scotland by settlers. Early records of the name mention Thomas le Procurator, County Lincolnshire in 1273. Willelmus Proktour of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Many factors contributed to the establishment of a surname system. For generations after the Norman Conquest of 1066 a very few dynasts and magnates passed on hereditary surnames, but the main of the population, with a wide choice of first-names out of Celtic, Old English, Norman and Latin, avoided ambiguity without the need for a second name. As society became more stabilized, there was property to leave in wills, the towns and villages grew and the labels that had served to distinguish a handful of folk in a friendly village were not adequate for a teeming slum where perhaps most of the householders were engaged in the same monotonous trade, so not even their occupations could distinguish them, and some first names were gaining a tiresome popularity, especially Thomas after 1170. The hereditary principle in surnames gained currency first in the South, and the poorer folk were slower to apply it. By the 14th century however, most of the population had acquired a second name. Gavin Proctor became apprentice in the smithy of the abbey in Angus in 1474. Edward Proctor and Effe Shute were married in London in the year 1579. Ann Procter was baptised at St. James, Clerkenwell, London in the year 1625. James Proctor is recorded in Easter-Whiewreath in the year of 1688. The name has many variant spellings which include Prockter, Procktor and Procter. A notable member of the name was Richard Anthony Proctor (1837-88) the English astronomer, born in Chelsea. A graduate of St. John’s College, Cambridge, he devoted himself from 1863 to astronomy. His name is associated with the determination of Mars. He founded a popular scientific magazine ‘Knowledge’ (1881). http://www.4crests.com/procter-coat-of-arms.html

    The Proctor surname is English. As for your family tree unless someone in your family, perhaps a distant cousin, has already done the research and posted it online somewhere you will need to build your own family tree. It’s a common misconception to think that one can “find “their family tree.

  2. > What is my heritage?
    European. You’d have to do research to get anymore specific than that.

    > My last names Proctor. What is that?
    English.

    > are there any sites i can find my family tree?

    No; if there were, crooks could find your birth day, birth place and mother’s maiden name, then pretend to be you and steal your money. Besides, your family isn’t interesting enough for someone who isn’t related to you to want to spend 300 hours researching it. Mine isn’t either. Barack Obama’s is; Tom Cruise’s is. Unless you are really rich or really famous or really lucky, your family tree isn’t on-line.

    My nieces and nephews are really lucky. I have spent years researching our family and posted my data on-line. I told all of them them about it, and where to look. If your aunt had done the same, she would have told you. She didn’t; you are out of luck.

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